Frontal view of Lexington Courthouse

Let Me Be Your Ray of Hope!

The best criminal defense lawyer for you and your situation.

Criminal lawyer wearing a suit and tie at Lexington courthouse

Eric L. Ray
Attorney At Law

Feel free to contact me to set up a consultation, we can discuss your case, your constitutional rights, and your options. I am proud to be a criminal defense attorney and I am proud to represent my clients. Thank you for visiting my website and thank you for your business.

What to consider when hiring a Criminal Defense Attorney for a felony or misdemeanor:

Whether you are hiring a lawyer to help you with a criminal case (theft, DUI, drug, assault) traffic, or divorce, it is important that you hire an experienced lawyer that you feel comfortable with. You want the best criminal defense lawyer for you and your situation. My goal is to make every single client feel like they are my only client. It is important to me that I meet my clients face to face, so that I can go through each of their questions and concerns in detail. I think this is crucial, whether the meeting occurs in my office, at the courthouse, or at the jail. Criminal cases and Divorces can have life changing effects and I take your trust very seriously.

It is important that you hire an experienced criminal defense lawyer who has handled cases similar to yours, whether you are charged with a felony or a misdemeanor. Early on in my career I have been blessed to have worked on a wide range of criminal cases, ranging from simple traffic tickets up to serious felonies. Whether you are faced with a traffic case, theft case, DUI, drug case, assault case, or divorce, you want a criminal defense lawyer who will give your case the attention, dedication, and hard work you deserve.

Areas of Criminal Law

Theft

A theft conviction can have an impact your ability to find future employment, which is why it is so important to have a criminal defense attorney review your case.

Burglary

Burglary crimes should be taken very seriously, especially because the punishments vary depending on the location that was allegedly burglarized.

Robbery

Robbery crimes can have long lasting affects on you life when you consider that you can face 5-20 years in jail, depending on the degree of Robbery.

Traffic Tickets

A traffic ticket can result in high fines, points on ​your license, or even a license suspension.

DUI

A DUI is a very serious charge and you are potentially facing fines, fees, alcohol classes, license suspension, or jail time.

Uncontested Divorce

During one of the more difficult times in anyone's life, it is crucial to make sure finances, debts, and court documents are ​appropriately handled.

Drug Crimes

With new drug laws being passed regularly, it is important to have an experienced crimianl defense attorney review your case, whether it involves drug possession, drug paraphernalia, or drug trafficking.

Assault Crimes

When reviewing assault crimes, it is important that you have a criminal defense attorney familiar with crucial defenses, such as self-defense or the castle doctrine.

Expungement

Everyone deserves a second chance and that is why Kentucky law allows Misdemeanors and even some Felonies to be expunged form your record.

Frequently asked questions

In Kentucky, a Misdemeanor is anything which has a maximum punishment of 12 months or less and a Felony is any crime which would involve a minimum sentence of one year or more.

There are two types of Misdemeanors:

  • Class A Misdemeanors can result in a maximum of 12 months in jail.
  • Class B Misdemeanors can result in a maximum of 90 days in jail


 

Felonies are broken down into 4 categories:

  • Class A Felonies result in 20-50 years in jail or life imprisonment.
  • Class B Felonies result in 10-20 years in jail.
  • Class C Felonies result in 5-10 years in jail.
  • Class D Felonies result in 1-5 years in jail.

I charge an advanced flat fee for criminal cases. The amount of the fee varies depending on the charge (whether it is a felony or misdemeanor), if the case goes to trial, and what county your case is located in.

You should always consult with a criminal defense lawyer before speaking to the police. A criminal attorney may review your situation and agree that you should speak to the police and fully cooperate, but you want that second opinion to make sure you are making the right decision.

Your first appearance in Court is called an Arraignment and it is your opportunity to find out what you are charged with and address your bond conditions if there are any. The vast majority of the time you will enter a not guilty plea so that you or your criminal lawyer can negotiate your case with the prosecutors.

The law can be very complex and you want to make sure you not only understand the charges and their consequences but also that you are not being overcharged. The last thing you want is to handle even a simple case yourself and then find out that you caused yourself more harm.

The prosecution may amend felony charges down to a misdemeanor, even if you have been indicted with a felony charge.

Both offices are prosecutors and both are run by elected officials. The main difference is that the Commonwealth Attorney’s Office only handles felonies which have been indicted. The County Attorney’s Office handles all traffic cases, misdemeanors, and felonies prior to indictment.

If the police violate your constitutional rights and obtain evidence against you, a criminal defense attorney will ask the Judge to not allow that evidence at trial. If the Judge agrees that the evidence was obtained in violation of your constitutional rights and cannot be used at trial, that evidence will be 'suppressed'. This normally involves an illegal search of you or your property, which violates your 4th amendment right.

You have the right to remain silent. Anything you say can and will be used against you in a court of law. You have the right to an attorney. If you cannot afford an attorney, one will be provided for you. You are normally read your Miranda rights before a police officer attempts to question you.

You waive the right to a speedy and public trial, including the right to trial by jury; the right to insist at a trial that the prosecution establish guilt beyond a reasonable doubt; the right to testify at a trial and the right not to testify at a trial; the right at a trial to be confronted by the witnesses against you, to present witnesses on your behalf, and to have compulsory process in securing their attendance. You generally waive the right to file further motions in the trial court, such as motions to object to the sufficiency of the charging papers to state an offense or to evidence allegedly obtained in violation of constitutional rights. You waive the right to appeal, except the right to appeal a motion that has been made, ruled upon and expressly reserved for appeal and the right to appeal an illegal or unauthorized sentence.

An Alford plea is when a defendant does not make an admission of guilt in open court, but the defendant admits that there is sufficient evidence that they could be convicted of the crime at trial.

Get To Know Eric L. Ray

Eric was born and raised in Somerset, KY, where he graduated from Somerset High School. He went on to obtain a B.A. in Psychology from the University of Kentucky, graduating Cum Laude. He then stayed in Lexington and attended the UK College of Law.

While attending Law School, he was on the Trial Advocacy Board and a member of the Student Public Interest Law Foundation. He also worked for the UK Legal Clinic, Jessamine County Attorney's Office, and Lexington Public Defender's Office, where he represented clients as a criminal defense attorney. He graduated in May 2012 and was admitted to the Kentucky Bar in October 2012. After being admitted to the bar, he worked in Salyersville, Kentucky, primarily handling Social Security Disability claims.

Eric returned to Lexington in March 2013 to open up his own law firm, where he focuses his practice on criminal defense. He was admitted to practice in the U.S. Federal District Court for the Eastern District of Kentucky, in May 2013. In his free time, he helps coach the Madison Southern High School Mock Trial team.

Recent News

05Nov 2018

Why your criminal defense lawyer cannot just "Call the Judge!"

I often have clients ask me to call the Judge to resolve an issue in their case. For example, "Call her to see if she will lower my bail." or "Have you spoken with the Judge to see if he will give me probation?" The problem is that the legal rules...

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08Jun 2018

Jailhouse lawyers make my life hard

One of the hardest parts about being a criminal lawyer is fighting the lies spread inside the jail. Inmates have a lot of time on their hands, which means they spend a lot of time thinking about their case and hearing other people talk about...

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07May 2018

Catchy news headlines are one of the reasons people are angry at our legal system

I have a weakness. I will admit it. Every time I see a legal story linked on my Facebook feed I know the title, story, or comments will make me mad, but I click on it anyway. Sometimes, I get so weak that I even start responding to comments, which

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